Category Archives: Anniversary

Don’t stop talking about race

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It is easy to reset, to move on to the next outrage, to the next shiny object.  “Ooh.  What’s that?”  We want to be distracted.  We hope that we can forget.

But, we cannot continue to let this be the case.  Race is a problem and it doesn’t just go away.  Instead, it is here to stay, stuck between our teeth, hanging on to our thin skin.  We carry it with us.  A word with sharp edges that we continue to wrap carefully and reuse, race is the weapon and the wound.

Still, we talk about race as if it is all we have, like it is all that we can say about ourselves, as if we are only flesh and blood.  We talk about race as if our lives depend on it, like we cease to exist if we are not socially colored beige, brown, black, red, yellow and white.  And though we cannot see the end of it (that is, post- racial), race is not our beginning. We cannot see past it but there is no future with race.

A socio- political construct, we talked ourselves into this belief in race and we will need to talk ourselves out of it.  You may not know this but we are not alone in this desire.  Recently, a number of books have been published that aim to discuss our relationship with race and empower readers to talk about it.  Please consider adding these to your reading list and your bookshelves:

Robin Diangelo, White Fragility: Why it’s so hard for white people to talk about racism, (Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 2018).

Carolyn B. Helsel, Anxious to talk about it: Helping White Christians Talk Faithfully About Racism, (Saint Louis, MO: Chalice Press, 2017).

Ijeoma Oluo, So you want to talk about race?, (New York, NY: Seal Press, 2018).

Derang Wing Sue, Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence: Understanding and Facilitating Difficult Dialogues on Race, (Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2015).

Shelly Tochluk, Witnessing Whiteness: The Need to Talk about Race and How to Do It, (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2010).

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Somebody’s got to dream (Part Two)

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April 4, 1968. Fifty years ago, a dreamer died. His “I have a dream” speech remains one of the most memorable to Americans. His life and its witness are unforgettable. Engaging faith and civil disobedience, he turned the world’s understanding of church upside down. Putting his body on the line, he became a martyr for a cause of freedom from the social construct of race, from socioeconomic and political exploitation and oppression, from the militarism of daily life and living.

His words challenged racism as usual, the normalization of hatred and communal terrorism. A Baptist minister, the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. is a part of the prophetic tradition of the Church, joining the likes of Ezekiel, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Malachi and so many others. A dream challenged in his day is a reality we hope to see in ours. We need more like him— not consultants or experts but dreamers.

Today, we sit down together across cultures and time, sharing sacred space in the spirit of unity. Rev. King’s dream is being fulfilled in us right now. His vision is in our sights.

And if you are not satisfied with the results thus far, if you feel that we have done enough, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. writes in Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?

“A final victory is an accumulation of many short-term encounters. To lightly dismiss a success because it does not usher in a complete order of justice is to fail to comprehend the process of full victory. It underestimates the value of confrontation and dissolves the confidence born of partial victory by which new efforts are powered.”

His dream does not simply continue as a hope in our hearts or even a vision for the future. Instead, King’s dream provokes us to not close our eyes but to open our hearts to what is possible and what can be if only we choose to see. And somebody’s got to do it. Somebody’s got to dream.

In Memory of the Emanuel Nine: Looking for the words

Image result for names of the emanuel 9I looked at their faces this morning and sighed.  “God, help us.”  One. Two. Three. Four. Five. Six. Seven. Eight. Nine. Lives.

They say a cat has nine lives.  But, how many lives does hate have?  Why won’t it die?  How does it continue to live after this?  How can we let it live on in us after this?

Two years ago, Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Cynthia Hurd, Rev. Sharonda Singleton, Tywanza Sanders, Susie Jackson, Ethel Lance, Myra Thompson, Rev. DePayne Middleton- Doctor and Rev. Daniel Simmons went to church and were murdered by twenty- one year old Dylann Roof.   As both a pastor and a parishioner, this hurts in places I can’t get to and it messes with my faith.

The only death that I think about while in church is that of Christ’s but there’s no crime tape.  No body bag.  No bullets.  No blood.

The Holy Scriptures talk about God as a place of safety and refuge.  And for hate to show up in a place where African Americans have gone to shield themselves from the assaults of society, find solace and support, express themselves apart from the restrictions of the social construct of race and to be seen and fully accepted is tragically unfair.  For this sacred space, a “church home” to be targeted by hate is incomprehensible.

I don’t know what to say or where to find the words to express this grief.  It goes down deep.  I shuffle my feet and begin to put my head between my knees.  I think that I am going to be sick.

“God help us.”

Happy 6th anniversary!

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Today, my blog turns six and she remains my baby.  While I have been graced to write for several other outlets and to even become a published author, this blog is my greatest accomplishment.  It was here that I took the risk to share the race-less gospel of Jesus Christ and I remain committed to this message.  To celebrate, I will work harder to spread this truth that God is not socially colored beige, brown, black, red, white or yellow– and neither are we.

Happy anniversary to me and to you.  Thanks for reading, writing, sharing, supporting, recruiting and following me along this race-less journey.  Let’s go another year!