For Ahmaud Arbery: I’ve got to run

The news has a cycle but I still run in a circle.  Most days, I lace up my running shoes, stretch and shake my legs out before running around a homemade track around a pond.  I run to work out problems.  I run down leads on ideas.  I run to reflect on my life and […]

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What day is it? Justice for Ahmaud Arbery is late

Justice isn’t blind; the justice system willingly turns a blind eye. Ahmaud Arbery was shot and killed in Brunswick, Georgia, on February 23, but Tom Durden, the district attorney didn’t request a formal investigation until May 5.  On May 6, the Kingsland Office began the investigation, and Arbery’s killers, the father and son, Gregory and […]

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True Justice

In June, I visited The Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Peace and Justice.  It is part of my work with the Louisville Institute for which I was awarded a pastoral study grant to examine the sociopolitical construct of race’s influence on the malformation of Christian community.  My project centers around the work and […]

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The National Memorial for Peace and Justice is set to open

“The matter came up for judicial investigation, but as might have been expected, the white people concluded it was unnecessary to wait the result of the investigation—that it was preferable to hang the accused first and try him afterward.” | Ida B. Wells- Barnett On April 26, the nation’s first memorial in honor of victims […]

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Lynching, nooses and the violence of silence

James Baldwin looked down at the red clay hills of Georgia and thought “that this earth had acquired its color from the blood that dripped down from the trees.”  That lynching is a part of America’s troubled history cannot be overstated and yet it is not often talked about.  Still, Billie Holiday sang of its […]

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